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Cytomegalovirus and Cochlear Implants 

Yoshida et al reported outcomes of four children diagnosed with cytomegalovirus (CMV), each of whom received cochlear implants (CIs) in Nagasaki, Japan. The authors compared four children with CMV to 17 age-matched CI recipients without CMV (non-CMV). At age of implant, the CMV children averaged 2.6 years of age, as did the non-CMV children (2.6 years).

Both groups had follow-up periods that averaged 3.3 years. Multiple measures were acquired pre- and post-op including hearing thresholds and motor, social, and language development and more.

At one year post-op, the children with CMV did not perform as well on measures of language perception and language production. Of note, the differences between the two groups (at that time) were statistically significant. However, over the longer term, the children with CMV achieved performance levels similar to the children in the non-CMV group.

Yoshida et al concluded that CIs provide considerable benefit across multiple parameters (hearing thresholds and development of speech and language, etc.) for children with CMV.

For More Information, References and Recommendations:
Yoshida H, Kanda Y, Takahashi H, Miyamoto I, Yamamoto T, Kumagami H. (2009) Cochlear Implantation In Children with Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection. Otology & Neurotology (30)6.