Adult

Adult

Childhood OM and Adult Hearing Loss

Aarhus et al (2015) report some 33,000 children were tested through pure-tone audiometry in Norway, and re-tested between ages 20 to 56 years. Of those 33,000 children, 3,066 children were reported to have hearing loss. Of note, otitis media with effusion (OME) was diagnosed in 1,255 children, chronic supparative otitis media (CSOM) was diagnosed in 108, and recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM) was diagnosed in 613 children.

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Accuracy of Subjective Reports of Hearing

Kamil, Genther, and Lin (2015) examined the relationship between objective and subjective reports of hearing loss. Specifically, they examined 3,557 reports from people enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (from two cycles: 1999–2006 and 2009–2010). All participants were 50 years of age or older, and each had completed a subjective hearing assessment and had completed an audiometric evaluation.

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Paired Comparisons: Non-Linear Frequency Compression, Extended Bandwidth, and Restricted Bandwidth

Brennan et al (2014) evaluated whether stimulus type (music passages and spoken sentences in quiet), age of listeners (children and adults), and degree of hearing loss influenced the listeners’ preferences for non-linear frequency compression (NFC), extended bandwidth (EBW), or restricted bandwidth (RBW). For the RBW and the NFC conditions, 5000 Hz was used as the low pass setting and for EBW, the simulator was set to 11,000 Hz. 

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Aging Trumps Normal Hearing in Speech Identification

Fullgrabe, Moore, and Stone (2015) investigated whether aging reduces the ability of people with normal audiograms to understand speech, and to determine the impact of cognition and auditory temporal processing.


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Comparing Fast, Slow and Adaptive Compression

Pittman, Pederson, and Rash (2014) report that over the last 25 years the noted benefits of compression have included a reduced need to adjust the volume control, listeners preference for compression, improved tolerance for loud sounds, and better adjustment to amplification. They note that two compression parameters are well known and well understood (compression kneepoint and compression ratio).

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Hearing Aid Noise-Reduction Programs and Listening Effort

Desjardins and Doherty (2014) evaluated listening effort, with and without a noise reduction algorithm, across 12 adult experienced hearing aid wearers (age range 50 to 74 years, mean=66 years). A dual-task paradigm was used. The primary task was a sentence-in-noise task, presented at two loudness levels. The first level was a moderate listening condition with a performance level of 76 percent and the second was a difficult listening condition” with a 50 percent performance level. To achieve these scores in quiet required various levels to meet the needs and abilities of the individuals.

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Training Localization Skills

Kuk et al (2014) evaluated the effectiveness of localization training on 15 participants with mild-to-moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Participants ranged in age from 28 to 83 years and the average age was 71. Each participant was an experienced hearing aid wearer. Of the 15 participants, 5 served as controls (i.e., received no training), 5 received home-based training and then lab training, and 5 received lab training and then home-based training. Lab-training used a 12-speaker protocol and home training used 2 speakers.

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Symphonic Musicians and Hearing Loss

Schmidt et al (2014) evaluated musicians from five Danish symphony orchestras in 2009 and 2010. The authors reported on 394 total musicians, of whom 337 musicians filled in the questionnaires. Audiometric measures were obtained from 212 musicians. Of those, 182 musicians (363 ears) results were analyzed with respect to sound exposure as well as mean thresholds at 3k, 4k and 6k.

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Socio-Demographics and Tinnitus

Previous studies have addressed issues and variables that correlate with tinnitus. However, Hoekstra, Wesdrop, and van Zanten (2014) report that previous studies have used univariate analysis, which potentially included (or perhaps were secondary to) unknown confounding effects. Therefore, in their retrospective study they used a multivariate analysis to evaluate the interdependencies between multiple variables.

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Frequency Lowering for Patients with Mild-to-Moderate SNHL?

Alexander, Kopun, and Stelmachowicz (2014) report their results with regard to two frequency lowering protocols: (1) frequency transposition (FT) via the Widex Inteo (source region spanned 4.2 to 7 kHz, target region spanned 2.1 to 3.5 kHz) and (2) non-linear frequency compression (NFC) via the Phonak Naida (source region was spanned 4 to 6 kHz and target region was 4 to 4.7 k Hz).

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