Audiogram

Audiogram

Illustration of a tumor in the head close to the inner ear

CASE STUDY INVESTIGATION | Site of Lesion Teasing

Case History

A female patient in her early 30s was presented to the otolaryngology and communicative sciences department at a large medical center. The patient presented with symptoms of pressure localized to both ears, however greater in right ear, occasional tinnitus in right ear (described as high pitch buzzing), and mild vertigo/dizziness (provoked by movement), lasting minutes in duration. 

Topic(s): otoscopy, Audiogram, tympanometry, Acoustic Reflexes, Bilateral tumors

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CASE STUDY INVESTIGATION | Of Heroes and Hearing

Case History

A male veteran (MV) in his early 50s recently presented to a Veterans Affairs (VA) audiology clinic stating that he had noticed a substantial decrease in his hearing ability following his military service. The MV served in the Navy and in the Army National Guard for a total of 32 years, which included many domestic and international service missions. While deployed to Iraq, he was exposed to a total of three bomb blasts, the most severe of which occurred approximately six years prior to presenting in the VA audiology clinic. 

Topic(s): Military Health, Hearing, otoscopy, tympanometry, Acoustic Reflexes, DPOAEs, Audiogram, WRS

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The Terminology of False and Exaggerated Hearing Loss

The Problem

Most audiologists probably have encountered a patient who produces within- or among-test discrepancies in audiometric results that have no medical explanation. This phenomenon goes under a multiplicity of terms. In addition to pseudohypacusis, nonorganic hearing loss, and functional hearing loss, there are malingering, dis/simulating, faking, feigning, conversion, hysterical, psychogenic, and more. 

Topic(s): false and exaggerated hearing loss (FEHL), Hearing Loss, Psychology, Audiogram, speech-in-noise, dysphonia, spastic dysphonia, spasmodic dysphonia

Author(s): 

Publication Issue: Audiology Today July/August 2019

Man pointing to the left and referenced the lion in Wizard of Oz

Li-Ions, and Trackers, and BAERs—Oh My: The Future of “Hearing Aid” Technology

In the classic movie, “The Wizard of Oz,” Dorothy realizes in order to reach the Emerald City, she must first travel through the dark and unfamiliar Enchanted Forest. Worried that they will be attacked, the Tinman predicts the forest will be filled mostly with “lions and tigers and bears.”  

Topic(s): hearing aid, Food and Drug Administration (FDA), personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids, OTC Hearing Aid Act, Technology, Audiogram

Author(s): 

Publication Issue: Audiology Today July/August 2018

JAAA Editorial: Rise of the Machines: Audiology and Mobile Devices

Over the past few decades, advances in mobile device technology have enabled many of the core audiology tests to be delivered through smart phones or tablet computers.

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ACAE CORNER | Practicing Preventive Audiology: Promoting Healthy Hearing

Case scenario 1...a 30-something audiologist completed a routine diagnostic assessment of a 35-year-old patient referred by her primary-care physician for rather vague complaints of inconsistent difficulty hearing in certain settings. 

The audiologist performed tympanometry, pure-tone audiometry, and phonetically-balanced (PB) word recognition testing at a comfortable loudness level. The patient’s history was unremarkable for any obvious etiologies or risks for hearing loss, although she enjoyed listening to loud music. 

Topic(s): Audiologist, Audiogram, Bilateral Hearing Loss, Patient care

Author(s): 

Publication Issue: Audiology Today March/April 2019

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False 4-kHz Air-Bone Gaps: A Failure of Standards

During the Eisenhower administration, more than half a century ago, the Third International Congress on Acoustics convened in Stuttgart, Germany. It was a wide-ranging conference covering all areas of psychological, physiological, and physical acoustics. The list of authors from the proceedings is a three-column, three-page Who’s Who that includes many of the most eminent auditory scientists of the day. Some of the familiar names on the roster include Georg von Békésy, Nelson Kiang, S.S. Stevens, Juergen Tonndorf, and Eberhard Zwicker. 

Topic(s): Audiogram, Bone Threshold, Hearing

Hearing in Noisy Listening Environments

An article published on September 26 in the Wall Street Journal addressed a challenge many aging Baby Boomers face on a daily basis—difficulty hearing in noisy listening environments, despite the absence of measurable audiometric hearing loss. This condition has been referred to as “hidden hearing loss,” and is thought to reflect cochlear synaptopathy or damage to the synaptic junction between cochlear hair cells and the auditory nerve.


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When to Fit Hearing Aids for Hearing Loss and Tinnitus?

Sereda et al (2015) report the results of their three-round Dephi Review, which explored “clinical consensus” (agreement of 70 percent or greater) of 28 hearing professional panelists in the United Kingdom. One hundred and fifteen (115) statements were evaluated and 58 statements achieved consensus.

Sample of factors that achieved consensus for fitting hearing aids with mild loss and without bothersome tinnitus:

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