Audiologist

Audiologist

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE | I Hope You Hear “Of Course!”

I hope 2020 is full of people responding to you with “of course.” The world needs more people saying “…of course.” Whether it is “of course you are welcome here” or “of course I’ll help.” Even “yes” isn’t as good as “of course.” “Yes” means it could have been “no”—“of course” means there was never any question. 

Topic(s): Hearing, AAA Conference, HearTECH Expo, Audiologist, Hands-On Pavilions, Cochlear Implants (CI), Professional

Image of care giver reading to young child

Learning to Listen: Audiologists Are Pivotal

Catherine Palmer, in her General Assembly Speech at the Academy’s 2019 annual conference, inspired us by emphasizing that audiologists have an incredibly important and expanded role in the health and well-being of the people we serve. 

“Audiologists start a chain of events for a child that will promote reading, education, and employment,” she said in her address. 

That chain of events starts with a child learning to listen and learning spoken language. This article will address the audiologist’s role in those events from a very practical perspective.

Topic(s): Audiologist, Professional Development, auditory information, auditory neural pathways, Hearing Loss, Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants (CI), Parents’ Evaluation of Aural/Oral Performance of Children (PEACH), auditory brainstem response (ABR), visual reinforcement audiology (VRA)

NPR Podcast Enforces That There Is Still Work to Be Done

In a recent NPR podcast, Dave Davies interviews David Owen, a staff writer for The New Yorker, about his recent book, Volume Control: Hearing in a Deafening World.

Read more

Marijuana and Tinnitus

Medicinal applications of marijuana and marijuana-derived products is an emerging topic of interest for many chronic conditions.

Read more

Public Relations Outreach Efforts: A Year in Review (October 2018- September 2019)

October is Audiology Awareness Month and we want to take this opportunity to showcase the media coverage to include audiology coverage, as well as that of our members over the past year.

Read more

JAAA Latest Fast Track Articles—October 2, 2019

As the JAAA editors along with our editorial team, we are proud to announce new Fast Track content for JAAA, as of October 2, 2019

Read more

Audiology Today Sept/Oct 2019…What’s Inside This Issue?

Take a look at the table of contents and delve into these online articles, which you can now easily search by topic, title, or author. 

Read more

Feature 1: Story image

Decoupling Professional Audiological Services from the Sale of Hearing Devices

Background

Helping adults manage hearing loss is by far the most fundamental aspect of audiology practice, making this the bread and butter of our profession. Hearing instruments play a crucial role in managing hearing loss in adults (Ftouh et al, 2018; Laplante-Lévesque et al, 2010).

Topic(s): over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aid devices, Patient care, Treatment, Hearing Aids, Hearing Assistive Technologies (HAT), Hearing Health Care, Audiologist

The Medicare Audiologist Access and Services Act

The Medicare Audiologist Access and Services Act

Issue Brief

Representatives Tom Rice (R-SC), Matt Cartwright (D-PA), Mark Meadows (R-NC), Ralph Norman (R-SC), Mike Kelly (R-PA), Jan Shakowsky (D-IL), Brad Schneider (D-IL), Ann Kuster (D-NH), Gus Bilirakis (R-FL), and Lisa Blunt-Rochester (D-DE) introduced H.R. 4056 on July 25, 2019. This legislation has been endorsed by the American Academy of Audiology, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, the Academy of Doctors of Audiology and the Hearing Loss Association of America. On September 9, 2019, U.S. Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Rand Paul (R-KY), Sherrod Brown (D-OH), and Roger F. Wicker (R-MS) introduced an identical companion bill in the Senate (S. 2446).

Medicare already covers a range of hearing health services, and audiologists are trained and licensed in all fifty states and the District of Columbia to perform these services. However, Medicare currently does not recognize audiologists as providers of most hearing-related services and will only allow reimbursement for a narrow set of tests to diagnose a hearing or balance disorder—and only if patients first obtain an order from a physician. Medicare’s rules are far more restrictive than many private and federal insurance plans. The Medicare Audiologist Access and Services Act ensures that Medicare beneficiaries have access to a full range of hearing and balance health care services provided by licensed audiologists. The bill:

  • Amends the definition of “audiology services” in the Medicare statute, which specifies the services that audiologists may provide, to include all services already covered by Medicare that are also within an audiologist’s scope of practice.
  • Amends the Medicare definition of “practitioner” to include audiologists, which improves beneficiary access to audiologic and vestibular care, a change that is consistent with Medicare’s classification of similar health care providers such as clinical social workers and clinical psychologists. 
  • Makes technical changes to the classification of audiology services in the Medicare system as “other diagnostic tests” to remove the pre-treatment order requirement, which does not exist with any other federal or commercial payer; and
  • Makes no change to the scope of hearing health benefits covered by Medicare or the scope of practice of audiologists.

View Issue Brief (PDF) | View Press Release (PDF) 

JAAA Latest Fast Track Articles—July 5, 2019

As the JAAA editors along with our editorial team, we are proud to announce new Fast Track content for JAAA, as of July 5, 2019. We are working diligently to publish ahead of print. We strive for a two-month turnaround on articles from acceptance to digital publication. Plan to see more of these announcements about content updates each month.

Read more