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Audiologist

Audiologist

Audiology Today Sept/Oct 2019…What’s Inside This Issue?

Take a look at the table of contents and delve into these online articles, which you can now easily search by topic, title, or author. 

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Decoupling Professional Audiological Services from the Sale of Hearing Devices

Background

Helping adults manage hearing loss is by far the most fundamental aspect of audiology practice, making this the bread and butter of our profession. Hearing instruments play a crucial role in managing hearing loss in adults (Ftouh et al, 2018; Laplante-Lévesque et al, 2010).

Topic(s): over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aid devices, Patient care, Treatment, Hearing Aids, Hearing Assistive Technologies (HAT), Hearing Health Care, Audiologist

The Medicare Audiologist Access and Services Act

The Medicare Audiologist Access and Services Act

Issue Brief

Representatives Tom Rice (R-SC), Matt Cartwright (D-PA), Mark Meadows (R-NC), Ralph Norman (R-SC), Mike Kelly (R-PA), Jan Shakowsky (D-IL), Brad Schneider (D-IL), Ann Kuster (D-NH), Gus Bilirakis (R-FL), and Lisa Blunt-Rochester (D-DE) introduced H.R. 4056 on July 25, 2019. This legislation has been endorsed by the American Academy of Audiology, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, the Academy of Doctors of Audiology and the Hearing Loss Association of America. On September 9, 2019, U.S. Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Rand Paul (R-KY), Sherrod Brown (D-OH), and Roger F. Wicker (R-MS) introduced an identical companion bill in the Senate (S. 2446).

Medicare already covers a range of hearing health services, and audiologists are trained and licensed in all fifty states and the District of Columbia to perform these services. However, Medicare currently does not recognize audiologists as providers of most hearing-related services and will only allow reimbursement for a narrow set of tests to diagnose a hearing or balance disorder—and only if patients first obtain an order from a physician. Medicare’s rules are far more restrictive than many private and federal insurance plans. The Medicare Audiologist Access and Services Act ensures that Medicare beneficiaries have access to a full range of hearing and balance health care services provided by licensed audiologists. The bill:

  • Amends the definition of “audiology services” in the Medicare statute, which specifies the services that audiologists may provide, to include all services already covered by Medicare that are also within an audiologist’s scope of practice.
  • Amends the Medicare definition of “practitioner” to include audiologists, which improves beneficiary access to audiologic and vestibular care, a change that is consistent with Medicare’s classification of similar health care providers such as clinical social workers and clinical psychologists. 
  • Makes technical changes to the classification of audiology services in the Medicare system as “other diagnostic tests” to remove the pre-treatment order requirement, which does not exist with any other federal or commercial payer; and
  • Makes no change to the scope of hearing health benefits covered by Medicare or the scope of practice of audiologists.

View Issue Brief (PDF) | View Press Release (PDF) 

JAAA Latest Fast Track Articles—July 5, 2019

As the JAAA editors along with our editorial team, we are proud to announce new Fast Track content for JAAA, as of July 5, 2019. We are working diligently to publish ahead of print. We strive for a two-month turnaround on articles from acceptance to digital publication. Plan to see more of these announcements about content updates each month.

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Audiological Counseling Practices: Survey of VA Dispensing Audiologists

Motivational interviewing (MI) is a collaborative approach to having a conversation about making a behavior change (Miller and Rollnick, 2013). While originally used to address problematic drinking, it has been used successfully with regard to other behavior changes, such as medication adherence (Palacio et al, 2016). The reaer is referred to Rollnick et al (2008) for an overview of applications in health-care settings.

Topic(s): Audiologist, Hearing Aids

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KNOW HOW | Lessons for a New Professional Becoming a Clinical Supervisor

As a new professional, I’ve had to learn how to become a clinical supervisor. While I learned the needed skills, I was fortunate to have very supportive, talented colleagues, as well as consistent contact from clinic coordinators at local universities. 

It’s important that audiologists at all points in their career participate in the clinical supervision of AuD graduate students. New professional supervisors can offer a great deal to graduate students and their learning. 

Here are some of the lessons that I’ve learned as I transitioned from student to supervisor.

Topic(s): Professional Development, Professional, Audiologist, American Board of Audiology (ABA)

Author(s): 

Publication Issue: Audiology Today July/August 2019

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SAA SPOTLIGHT | Audiologists with Hearing Loss: A Different Perspective

On Thursday, April 6, 2017, at AudiologyNOW! (now AAA Annual Conference) in Indianapolis, Indiana, the annual Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Audiologists Meeting sparked connections and a desire to change perspectives. 

Topic(s): SAA - Student Academy of Audiology, AAA Conference, Hearing Loss, Audiologist

Audiology Today Mar/Apr 2019…What’s Inside This Issue?

The editorial team and I are so happy to announce the content for this latest issue of Audiology Today. We are featuring a number of comprehensive, relevant, and interesting articles, as well as some short reads on public relations, coding and reimbursement, and audiology advocacy.

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ACAE CORNER | Off to a Great Start

The doctor of audiology (AuD) degree was developed to support a profession with a scope of practice that had outgrown its existing educational standards. Multiple professional associations, including the American Academy of Audiology, the American Speech–Language–Hearing Association, and the Academy of Dispensing Audiologists (later renamed the Academy of Doctors of Audiology) worked to define the expanding knowledge and skills expected of competent audiologists.

Topic(s): Audiologist, Education, Professional

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ACAE CORNER | Practicing Preventive Audiology: Promoting Healthy Hearing

Case scenario 1...a 30-something audiologist completed a routine diagnostic assessment of a 35-year-old patient referred by her primary-care physician for rather vague complaints of inconsistent difficulty hearing in certain settings. 

The audiologist performed tympanometry, pure-tone audiometry, and phonetically-balanced (PB) word recognition testing at a comfortable loudness level. The patient’s history was unremarkable for any obvious etiologies or risks for hearing loss, although she enjoyed listening to loud music. 

Topic(s): Audiologist, Audiogram, Bilateral Hearing Loss, Patient care

Author(s): 

Publication Issue: Audiology Today March/April 2019