Cochlear Implants (CI)

Cochlear Implants (CI)

Rebecca Krill’s TED Talk: How Technology Has Changed What It’s Like to Be Deaf

By Erin Schafer, PhD


As audiologists, we live and breathe hearing technology, but we don’t always have the opportunity to learn about how a lifetime of hearing technology shaped a person’s life.


I had the distinct pleasure of learning about Rebecca Krill’s journey with congenital hearing loss in her recent TED talk, “How technology has changed what it’s like to be deaf.”


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Catherine Palmer, Academy President photo

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE | Real Change for Our Profession

On Friday, March 20, 2020, the entire group of audiologists I work with at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) was taking care of patients in person. Three days later, Monday, March 23, 2020, we were providing all of our services remotely. 

We had been thinking about expanding into telehealth over the past year, but we had all sorts of reasons why it wouldn’t, couldn’t, and shouldn’t work. And then one day, it had to work or we wouldn’t have been able to take care of our patients. 

Topic(s): President's Message, audiology, Telehealth, tele-audiology, teleaudiology, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), CARES Act, Medicare, cochlear implant codes, Cochlear Implants (CI)

Publication Issue: Audiology Today July/August 2020

A photographic illustration of 8 types of hearing devices

From Hearing Aids to Cochlear Implants: The State of Wireless Technology

Over the last 10 years, wireless technology has been a driver of innovation in hearing aids and cochlear implants. Today, our counseling narratives almost universally include discussion of the features and benefits that are enabled by wireless connectivity—it’s been a short trip from novelty to normal. This article reviews the evolution of ear-level wireless technologies and summarizes the landscape across hearing aids and cochlear implants. 

Topic(s): Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants (CI), Magnetic induction and radio frequency (RF), near-field magnetic induction (NFMI), Bluetooth

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Publication Issue: Audiology Today July/August 2020

Abstract Illustration of group building a process of providing Cochlear Implants into your practice

Cochlear Implants in Private Practice…My Practice?

The world of cochlear implants (CIs) is evolving. What was once a treatment pathway for a limited population of patients with profound hearing impairment has expanded to include individuals with moderate to severe hearing loss. CI technology, which began as basic sound processing through an electrode array, has grown to include Bluetooth streaming and cell phone connectivity. 

Topic(s): Cochlear Implants (CI), CI, Hearing Impairment (HI), Hearing Loss, Hearing Aids

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Publication Issue: Audiology Today July/August 2020

Tinnitus? Or Notched or Sloped Hearing Loss?

Tinnitus is a heterogenous phenomenon that includes a range of sound percepts, patient reactions, and patient characteristics. It is also not uncommon for patients to complain of tinnitus, but based upon further inquiry to determine their chief complaint is actually hearing loss.


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From the back, a young boy working in school with cochlear implant

CODING AND REIMBURSEMENT | Specialty Series: Cochlear Implants

In July 2019, the American Academy of Audiology released its Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cochlear Implants (CIs) (Messersmith et al, 2019). Cochlear implantation is a surgical procedure for the treatment of severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss in both children and adults. 

Topic(s): Cochlear Implants (CI), Coding, Reimbursement

The Continuum of Care for Treating Hearing Loss: Incorporating Cochlear Implants into Audiology Practice

This year at AAA 2020 + HearTECH Expo, you’ll have the opportunity to be part of the solution, increasing access to CI for patients who can benefit from it.

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE | I Hope You Hear “Of Course!”

I hope 2020 is full of people responding to you with “of course.” The world needs more people saying “…of course.” Whether it is “of course you are welcome here” or “of course I’ll help.” Even “yes” isn’t as good as “of course.” “Yes” means it could have been “no”—“of course” means there was never any question. 

Topic(s): Hearing, AAA Conference, HearTECH Expo, Audiologist, Hands-On Pavilions, Cochlear Implants (CI), Professional

Image of care giver reading to young child

Learning to Listen: Audiologists Are Pivotal

Catherine Palmer, in her General Assembly Speech at the Academy’s 2019 annual conference, inspired us by emphasizing that audiologists have an incredibly important and expanded role in the health and well-being of the people we serve. 

“Audiologists start a chain of events for a child that will promote reading, education, and employment,” she said in her address. 

That chain of events starts with a child learning to listen and learning spoken language. This article will address the audiologist’s role in those events from a very practical perspective.

Topic(s): Audiologist, Professional Development, auditory information, auditory neural pathways, Hearing Loss, Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants (CI), Parents’ Evaluation of Aural/Oral Performance of Children (PEACH), auditory brainstem response (ABR), visual reinforcement audiology (VRA)

Cropped image of a group of young children holding hands outside

Friendship and Loneliness in Children and Adolescents with Hearing Loss

Our clinical concerns for children who are deaf or hard of hearing center on providing audible and comfortable access to sound. Our counterparts in speech-language pathology focus on developing receptive and expressive communication skills. 

Although our field excels at helping children with hearing loss who use auditory technology (i.e., hearing aids and/or cochlear implants) acquire speech, language, and hearing skills, we do not necessarily shine in addressing how these children use their communication abilities in the real world. 

Topic(s): Psychology, speech-language pathologist, Hearing Loss, Cochlear Implants (CI), speech production, speech intelligibility, language, speech-in-noise