Cochlear Implants (CI)

Cochlear Implants (CI)

NPR Interviews Gifford About Her Work with Cochlear Implant Patients

National Public Radio's "Science Friday" launched a six-part series highlighting women in science with a 10-minute video documentary featuring Academy member Dr. Rene Gifford and her work with cochlear implant patients at Vanderbilt University.

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Children with ANSD Fitted with Hearing Aids

Intervention for children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) represents a significant challenge in pediatric audiology. A critical tool for the fitting of amplification in young pediatric patients, the auditory brainstem response (ABR), is compromised in this population for estimation of behavioral thresholds. Despite compromised ABR responses, cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP) can often be recorded from ANSD patients, and there is emerging research in the application of CAEP for estimation of behavioral thresholds in this population (He et al. 2013).

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Study Finds Support for Classroom Acoustics Standards (ANSI/ASA, 2010)

A recently-published study by Frank Ingelhart evaluated the speech perception performance of 23 children with cochlear implants and 23 children with normal hearing through the speech frequencies (500-4000 Hz). Speech perception testing was completed in a classroom environment at three different reverberation times—0.9 seconds, 0.6 seconds, and 0.3 seconds.


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Parents of Deaf Children, Stuck in the Middle of an Argument

Thoughtful piece on the dilemma faced by parents of “deaf” children. One thing that many audiologists might take issue with is the statement that “hearing aid use in children, which requires years of visits with doctors, audiologists, and speech therapists, remains controversial.”  Studies show that early diagnosis, ongoing intervention with hearing aids, and aural (re)habilitation is beneficial for children with adequate residual hearing.

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A Blog to Follow

Opinion Editorial by Sumit Dhar, PhD


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Single-Sided Deafness, Cochlear Implants, and Speech Understanding

Zeitler et al (2015) reported on nine people (ages 12 to 63 years) with single-sided deafness (SSD) and normal hearing in the other ear, all of whom underwent cochlear implantation in the SSD ear. With regard to post-op speech understanding in noise, the authors report “one of our aims was to assess the value of a CI for SSD patients when the listening environment simulated a ‘real world’ situation, that is, listening in a restaurant where the talker was on the side of the CI.

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The Importance of Frequency Regions for Cochlear Implant Patients

Sladen and Ricketts (2015) report that given current cochlear implant (CI) technology, the majority of post-lingually deafened adults achieve 80 percent word recognition (in quiet) after only six months experience with a CI. In their study, CI users were presented with monaural information and the NH listeners had binaural input. The noisy condition was a 10 dB SNR with six-talker babble. Of note, “the average decrease in performance between quiet and noisy conditions was 13% for the NH group and 20 percent for the CI group.”  

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Bimodal Programming

Siburt and Holmes (2015) report that 93 responses to their survey, which queried who programs the hearing aid (adult patients) given a bimodal fitting (‘bimodal’ as used here indicates one ear has a cochlear implant [CI] and the other has a hearing aid). The respondents represented multiple clinical settings (private practice, ENT clinics, university clinics, and hospitals). Fifty-seven responses were from “small centers” (fewer than or up to 20 adult patients per year) and 36 were from “large centers” (more than 20 patients per year).

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The Importance of Pitch Discrimination in Cochlear Implant Users

Wang et al (2011) evaluated 19 adult cochlear implant (CI) users and 10 normal hearing listeners with regard to their perception of tone/pitch. CI users demonstrated a mean threshold for pitch discrimination of 5.5 semitones (with a range from 0.8 semitones to 19.6 semitones). People with normal hearing demonstrated average thresholds of 0.4 semitones.

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Cochlear Implant Satisfaction and Psychological Profiles

Kobosko et al (2015) report that when post-lingually deafened adults acquire a cochlear implant, the benefits extend beyond hearing. That is, quality of life improves, as does psychological well-being and social interactions. The authors studied the relationship between cochlear implant (CI) satisfaction and level of psychological distress, stress coping strategies, and global self-esteem.

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