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Conditions/Diseases

Conditions/Diseases

Unilateral Hearing Loss and Brain Changes

Liu et al (2015) report that sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) may be due to multiple etiologies, such as noise exposure, aging, infections, ototoxic chemicals, vascular compromise, disruption of cochlear membranes, inner ear abnormalities, immunologic disorders, and more. However, they report that it is rare to have a single specific etiology attributed to an individual.

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Mental Health, Subjective Well-Being, and Meniere’s Disease

The largest study ever published to investigate the relationships among Meniere’s Disease, an individual’s mental health (MH), and subjective well-being (SWB) was recently published by Tyrrell et al (2015). The authors reported on 1,376 people who self-reported having Meniere’s Disease (MD) through the United Kingdom’s (UK) Biobank and compared these results to 500,000 controls.

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Comparing CROS Hearing Aids and Bone-Anchored Hearing Devices

Finbow et al (2015) evaluated 8 adults with single-sided deafness (SSD) with regard to contralateral routing of signal (CROS) and bone-anchored hearing devices (BHADs). The authors report CROS and BAHDs are the two main interventions used to treat SSD, although they also report cochlear implants (CIs) have also been used to treat SSD.

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Childhood OM and Adult Hearing Loss

Aarhus et al (2015) report some 33,000 children were tested through pure-tone audiometry in Norway, and re-tested between ages 20 to 56 years. Of those 33,000 children, 3,066 children were reported to have hearing loss. Of note, otitis media with effusion (OME) was diagnosed in 1,255 children, chronic supparative otitis media (CSOM) was diagnosed in 108, and recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM) was diagnosed in 613 children.

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Cochlear Implants and Cognitive Function?

Mosnier et al (2015) and colleagues evaluated the relationship between cognitive function and hearing restoration through cochlear implants (CIs) in elderly patients. The study was performed between 2006 and 2009 and included 94 patients between 65 and 85 years of age. Each participant was evaluated pre-op, and 6 and 12 months post-op. Six tests were used to assess cognitive function including the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE), the 5-Word Test, the Clock-Drawing Test, Verbal Fluency Test, the D2 Test of Attention and Trail Making Tests (parts A and B).

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Bringing Music to Your Ears: Interview with Justin Osmond

Douglas L. Beck, AuD, spoke with Justin about The Children's Miracle Network, The Olive Osmond Hearing Fund, The Osmond Foundation, Bringing Music to your Ears, and his 250-mile run to benefit 25 kids, May 2–9, 2015.

Academy: Good morning, Justin! It's always a joy to speak with you.

Osmond: Hi, Doug. Always great to speak and catch up with you, too.

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Invisible Hearing Loss

Opinion Editorial by Douglas L. Beck, AuD

A relatively new term in audiology is invisible hearing loss. Of course, it's not new or surprising to hearing care professionals (HCPs) that hearing loss is "invisible." That is, the person with hearing loss looks exactly like the person without hearing loss (unlike a person with a broken arm or leg, or a person in need of a wheel chair, or a person wearing glasses….).

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How Young to Test APD?

Lucker (2015) reports that nothing in the guidelines from the national associations state that children under age seven cannot be assessed for auditory processing.

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Spoken Language and Bilateral Cochlear Implants

Sarant et al (2014) compared the spoken language outcomes of children with unilateral and bilateral cochlear implants (CIs). The authors report that “bilateral cochlear implantation is becoming the standard of care….” They note that bilateral CIs offer binaural redundancy through the involvement of two ears. The brain has two opportunities to process sound: (1) binaural summation (the increased loudness availed via 2 ears) and (2) the head-shadow effect (the head acting as a barrier and therefore reducing the loudness at the ear farther from the sound source).

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Hearing Aid Noise-Reduction Programs and Listening Effort

Desjardins and Doherty (2014) evaluated listening effort, with and without a noise reduction algorithm, across 12 adult experienced hearing aid wearers (age range 50 to 74 years, mean=66 years). A dual-task paradigm was used. The primary task was a sentence-in-noise task, presented at two loudness levels. The first level was a moderate listening condition with a performance level of 76 percent and the second was a difficult listening condition” with a 50 percent performance level. To achieve these scores in quiet required various levels to meet the needs and abilities of the individuals.

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