Diagnostics

Diagnostics

Tinnitus Management 2014: Part One

Fagelson (2014) reports that tinnitus affects some 10 to 15 percent of the population. He reports that there is no relationship between the distress/severity of the perceived tinnitus and auditory sensitivity and indeed, some 50 percent (or more) of tinnitus sufferers have a comorbid psychological injury or illness such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTST), depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, stress, and more.

Read more

NAL vs DSL in Three-Year-Olds

In 2010, Ching et al concluded that to achieve optimum audibility for soft speech, children required more gain than NAL-NL1 prescribed, and to achieve listening comfort in noise, children required less gain than DSLv4.1 prescribed.

Read more

BiCROS in Noise

Oeding and Valente (2013) examined the performance of a bilateral contralateral routing of signal (BiCROS) hearing aid in noise while engaging the receiver and transmitter noise reduction (NR) technology within Unitron’s Tandem 16 (16 channel) BiCROS hearing aid. The authors report that there are few peer-reviewed studies in which the efficacy and effectiveness of BiCROS technology has been examined in background noise. Twenty-one adults experienced with BiCROS participated in the study.

Read more

Textbook of Hearing Aid Amplification: Interview with Michael J. Metz, PhD

Douglas L. Beck, AuD, spoke with Dr. Metz about his rewrite of Sandlin’s book, Textbook of Hearing Aid Amplification, and how things have changed in the third edition.


Academy: Hi, Mike. Great to hear your voice! Thanks for your time today.


Metz: Hi, Doug. Thanks, good to speak with you, too.


Read more

Pediatric Amplification Perspectives 2014: Part 2

Dillon, Ching, and Golding (2014) report commercially available hearing aids are available that switch automatically from omni to directional mode (if and only if) the directional mode has a superior signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Further, it is well known and has been consistently demonstrated that children require a more advantageous SNR than do adults, and it is far more likely that adaptive directionality will provide a listening advantage rather than a disadvantage.

Read more

Pediatric Amplification Perspectives 2014: Part 1

Dillon, Ching, and Golding (2014) report three major reasons why special considerations are needed when fitting hearing aids to children.

Read more

Auditory Reflections: Mirror Neurons

Mirror neurons are a concept. At this time, they represent more of an idea than an actual well-defined biologically based structure. Nonethelesss, they are often mentioned with regard to the way learning and communication occurs in humans, and are explored in this article.


By Douglas L. Beck, AuD

Read more

Diabetes and Hearing Loss: 2008 Update and Review

Type I diabetes (insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, IDDM) is often referred to as “juvenile onset” diabetes and represents some 5 to 10 percent of all known cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes (non-IDDM) accounts for some 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases. Type 1 diabetics must acquire insulin via injection or a pump. Type 2 diabetics can often control their diabetes via healthy eating and exercise and sometimes oral meds are prescribed.

Read more

Management of BPPV 2008: Interview with Alan Desmond, AuD, Blue Ridge Hearing and Balance Clinic, Princeton, WV

We have a long way to go in getting the word out about BPPV and the in-office repositioning maneuvers that have a very high success rate.


By Douglas L. Beck, AuD

Academy/Beck: Hi, Alan. Good to speak with you again.

Desmond: Hi, Doug. Thanks for having me.

Read more

Using Ultrasound to Study Motion: An Interview with Professor John H. Page, PhD

As audiologists, we live in very focused arenas, such as human hearing. However, there are many sounds above, below and beyond human perception. Further, there are many things sound facilitates besides speech, language, music and background noise. In this interview, we explore some uses of sound with respect to non-human production and perception of sound.


By Douglas L. Beck, AuD

Academy/Beck: Hi, John. It’s an honor to meet you.

Page: Hi, Doug. Thanks. It’s nice to meet you, too.

Read more