Ear

Ear

Age-Related Hearing Loss: Fruit Flies and Humans

Did you know that fruit fly antennal ears share many similarities with human ears?

Keder and colleagues (2020) report on the hearing sensitivity of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) across its lifespan of approximately 70 days.

Similar to human hearing, with age, hearing of the fruit files declines, with the hearing loss occurring after 50 days of life in the fruit fly.

Read more

JAAA Editorial: The Effect of Loss of Speech Audibility on a Measure of Cognitive Function

It has been estimated that, in the United States, approximately 75 percent of adults over the age of 70 years have hearing impairment ranging from mild to profound (Goman and Lin, 2016). As the population of the world ages, we will have to contend with a larger number of patients who experience ear-related disorders of aging (e.g., presbycusis and presbystasis) and an assortment of diseases that affect older individuals. Dementia is one of those diseases/disorders.

Read more

New Genetic Study May Be the Key to Alternative Treatment to Hearing Loss

Is science getting closer to identifying ways to reverse hearing loss from damaged hair cells?

Read more

Surfer’s Ear—External Auditory Exostoses

External auditory exostoses (EAE) are dense bony growths protruding into the external auditory canal. These benign bony growths are often referred to as surfer’s ear due to observations of these growths in the ears of individuals exposed to a combination of cold water and air. 

Read more

The Rooster’s Closing Canal

Birds, with the exception of the Barn Owl, do not hear well at high frequencies. Chicken (hen or rooster), for example, have very sensitive hearing in the low frequencies but are limited to hearing sounds below 10 kHz. Given their sensitivity to low-frequency sound, one might wonder how a rooster that wakes up entire villages every morning with its crowing, keeps from losing its own hearing.

Read more