Geriatric

Geriatric

COVID-19: Considerations for Treatments Using Quinine Derivatives and Other Ototoxic Compounds

Hydroxychloroquine was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for emergency use to treat adults and adolescents with COVID-19.

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JAAA Editorial: The Effect of Loss of Speech Audibility on a Measure of Cognitive Function

It has been estimated that, in the United States, approximately 75 percent of adults over the age of 70 years have hearing impairment ranging from mild to profound (Goman and Lin, 2016). As the population of the world ages, we will have to contend with a larger number of patients who experience ear-related disorders of aging (e.g., presbycusis and presbystasis) and an assortment of diseases that affect older individuals. Dementia is one of those diseases/disorders.

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Audiology Today Sept/Oct 2019…What’s Inside This Issue?

Take a look at the table of contents and delve into these online articles, which you can now easily search by topic, title, or author. 

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Post-Menopausal Hormonal Changes and Processing of Auditory Information

Could the hormonal changes associated with menopause affect a woman’s ability to process auditory information?

Trott et al (2019) compared performance on tests of central auditory function between 14 pre-menopausal women (mean age = 30 years) and 14 peri- or post-menopausal women (mean age = 54 years). All subject had pure-tone hearing thresholds of 25 dB HL or better at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz in both of the ears.

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Hearing Loss Is Truly Depressing

Want to provide your patients with more information over the health impacts of hearing loss?

In a study by Golub and colleagues (2018), an association was found between age-related hearing loss and depression. This cross-sectional study of Hispanic adults revealed that for every 20 dB increase in hearing loss, the risk for depressive symptoms increased approximately 45 percent. The implications of these findings are discussed in this JAMA article.

Reference

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Ears and Brain

A recent Morning Edition on NPR highlighted the role of hearing aids in slowing the rate of cognitive decline in older adults. The feature highlighted the work of Maharani et al (2018) that examined the relationship. Drawing data from the Health and Retirement Study (HSR), Maharani and colleagues showed that cognitive function based on episodic memory (word recall) was associated with hearing aid use and that decline in episodic memory was mitigated by reported use of hearing aids. The authors reported the rate of decline was reduced by 75 percent.

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Hearing Loss in Nursing Homes

As audiologists, we are uniquely aware that the elderly are disproportionally impacted by hearing loss and are aware of solutions that might be beneficial for those with hearing loss. Is this knowledge shared by all professionals who work with the elderly?


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Age-Related Prejudice Toward Hearing Loss in United States?

A new study published in JAMA suggests age-related prejudice toward hearing loss in the United States—that is, although 98 percent of newborns are now screened for hearing loss, we continue to accept that hearing loss is a normal consequence of aging, despite links to social isolation, depression, and other related health conditions.

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Detecting Hearing Loss, Vertigo Via Blood Tests

On the one hand, the ability to detect inner-ear proteins as biomarkers of hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction from blood samples is very promising, but on the other, how hard is it to get the more primary care physicians to refer for a hearing test?

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Benefits of Oysters

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