mental health

mental health

Eerie Experiences of the Ear (Inner)

Have you ever had an “out-of-body” experience (OBE)? An OBE is considered a state where your center of awareness is located outside of your physical body, along with the sensation of seeing the environment from an elevated position. Current neuroscientific models of OBE suggest failure in integration of visual, somatosensory, and yes, vestibular input.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Tinnitus

Tinnitus management is nuanced and many approaches can be taken, some supported by more evidence than others. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) repeatedly has been shown to be an effective approach to help patients manage their tinnitus distress. This article provides a general overview of what CBT entails and when to consider referring your tinnitus patients to a health-care provider who specializes in CBT.

Topic(s): Tinnitus, Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), asha, American Academy Otoringology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS), mental health, Tinnitus Management, Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI)

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Parental Separation and Parental Mental Health in Childhood: Coping with Tinnitus and Hyperacusis in Adulthood

Tinnitus is the sensation of sound without any external sound source. Hyperacusis is intolerance of certain everyday sounds that causes significant distress and impairment in social, occupational, recreational, and other day-to-day activities (Aazh et al, 2016). The sounds may be perceived as uncomfortably loud, unpleasant, frightening, or painful (Tyler et al, 2014).  

Topic(s): mental health, Tinnitus, Hyperacusis, Pediatric, Adult, adverse childhood experiences (ACE), Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Therapy Specialist Clinic (THTSC), Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ), ear, nose, and throat (ENT)

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Publication Issue: Audiology Today November/December 2019

JAAA Editorial: Chronic Dizziness and Mental Health Comorbidity

The majority of patients who report experiencing an acute vestibular syndrome (i.e., neuritis or labyrinthine impairment) will be symptom free after a few weeks. There are those, however, who continue to experience symptoms even following medical treatment and therapy.

The investigators sampled 50 veterans and characterized their symptoms associated with dizziness and vertigo and catalogued their mental health comorbidities. This study illustrates how we must begin to look beyond just the structural impairments that are identified by laboratory testing and treat the patient as a whole.

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