Military Health

Military Health

Illustration of pentagon maze-like line that connects with ear-shaped line art

Better Hearing Health Across the Department of Defense

Originating from the rehabilitation of noise-induced hearing losses (NIHL) incurred during World War I and II, the Department of Defense (DoD) has historically led the fields of hearing conservation and audiology   (Bergman, 2002).

In fact, the earliest hearing-conservation regulations came from the military services with the Air Force in 1956. The change that the U.S. Army made to the Army Hearing Program in 2008 to make hearing capabilities rather than hearing-loss prevention the primary focus has continued this tradition of innovation and leadership.

Topic(s): Department of Defense, Hearing Health Care, hearing loss prevention, hearing capabilities, Military Health

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CASE STUDY INVESTIGATION | Of Heroes and Hearing

Case History

A male veteran (MV) in his early 50s recently presented to a Veterans Affairs (VA) audiology clinic stating that he had noticed a substantial decrease in his hearing ability following his military service. The MV served in the Navy and in the Army National Guard for a total of 32 years, which included many domestic and international service missions. While deployed to Iraq, he was exposed to a total of three bomb blasts, the most severe of which occurred approximately six years prior to presenting in the VA audiology clinic. 

Topic(s): Military Health, Hearing, otoscopy, tympanometry, Acoustic Reflexes, DPOAEs, Audiogram, WRS

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An Auditory Perspective on Concussion

Americans love football. In early February, more than 100 million viewers tuned in to the Super Bowl to watch the Philadelphia Eagles battle the New England Patriots. Despite a decline of about
7 percent in viewers from the 2017 Super Bowl, this event, like in years past, will likely be the most-watched television event of the year. In fact, Super Bowl viewership can more than double its closest competitor, typically a  presidential address or debate. 

Topic(s): Concussion, CTE, auditory brain, Military Health