Normal Hearing

Normal Hearing

Temporal Processing Deficits

Helfer and Vargo (2009) noted that, "It is tantalizing to consider that temporal processing may be an underlying cause of problems understanding speech in competing speech." More recently, Fullgrabe et al (2015) investigated the impact of aging with regard to the ability of people with normal audiograms to understand speech, and they sought to determine the impact of cognition and auditory temporal processing on speech understanding.

Read more

Cochlear Implants, Normal Hearing, and Single-Sided Deafness

Many reports in the literature have demonstrated that cochlear implants are a reasonable, successful, and viable option for people with severe-to-profound unilateral hearing loss (Arndt et al 2011; Baguley, 2010; Buechner et al 2010; Popelka et al 2010; Van Zon et al 2015; Van De Heyning et al 2008).


Read more

Cochlear Implants and Music Perception: 2015

Wang, Zhou, and Xu (2011) evaluated 19 adult cochlear implant (CI) uses with regard to pitch perception. They reported that normal hearing listeners could identify changes in pitch of 0.4 semitones (the difference in two neighboring keys on a piano is one semitone). However, on average, people with CIs required 5.5 semitones (i.e., 5.5 keys white keys on a piano) to notice a change in pitch. Of note, the range of performance for the CI group was from 0.8 semitones to 19.6 semitones.  

Read more

Issues in Invisible Hearing Loss

Beck (2015) reported that when a patient presents with normal (or abnormal) pure-tone thresholds and their chief complaint is the inability to understand speech clearly in quiet or noise, a thorough diagnostic battery is called for. “The goal is not to simply document peripheral hearing loss, rather, the goal is to diagnose or describe the auditory-based communication disorder (i.e., a communication disorder manifested via audition).”  He notes that a simple audiogram cannot document, estimate, reflect, or quantify speech-in-noise problems, neural or auditory processing difficulties, percei

Read more

Accuracy of Subjective Reports of Hearing

Kamil, Genther, and Lin (2015) examined the relationship between objective and subjective reports of hearing loss. Specifically, they examined 3,557 reports from people enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (from two cycles: 1999–2006 and 2009–2010). All participants were 50 years of age or older, and each had completed a subjective hearing assessment and had completed an audiometric evaluation.

Read more

Aging Trumps Normal Hearing in Speech Identification

Fullgrabe, Moore, and Stone (2015) investigated whether aging reduces the ability of people with normal audiograms to understand speech, and to determine the impact of cognition and auditory temporal processing.


Read more

Comparing Fast, Slow and Adaptive Compression

Pittman, Pederson, and Rash (2014) report that over the last 25 years the noted benefits of compression have included a reduced need to adjust the volume control, listeners preference for compression, improved tolerance for loud sounds, and better adjustment to amplification. They note that two compression parameters are well known and well understood (compression kneepoint and compression ratio).

Read more