Psychology

Psychology

Behavioral economics graphic

Behavioral Economics: A Conversation with Dr. Daniel Mochon, AAA 2020 Keynote Presenter

On a recent trip to New Orleans to attend the Louisiana Academy of Audiology meeting, I had the pleasure of sitting down and talking with Dr. Daniel Mochon, who will be the keynote speaker at the AAA 2020 General Assembly, sponsored by Amplifon. AAA 2020 + HearTECH Expo will take place in New Orleans, Louisiana, April 1–4. 

Topic(s): Behavioral Economics, AAA Conference, HearTECH Expo, Psychology, audiology, Hearing Health Care, Hearing Aids, Amplification, assistive-listening devices

Cropped image of a group of young children holding hands outside

Friendship and Loneliness in Children and Adolescents with Hearing Loss

Our clinical concerns for children who are deaf or hard of hearing center on providing audible and comfortable access to sound. Our counterparts in speech-language pathology focus on developing receptive and expressive communication skills. 

Although our field excels at helping children with hearing loss who use auditory technology (i.e., hearing aids and/or cochlear implants) acquire speech, language, and hearing skills, we do not necessarily shine in addressing how these children use their communication abilities in the real world. 

Topic(s): Psychology, speech-language pathologist, Hearing Loss, Cochlear Implants (CI), speech production, speech intelligibility, language, speech-in-noise

Female audiologist testing young boy hearing while he is playing with blocks

Behavioral Techniques in Pediatric Audiology

The standard behavioral procedures used to assess the hearing of very young children are powerful tools. Yet, even in the hands of a skilled clinician, they are nearly worthless unless the child is ready to be tested. Thus, it is helpful—indeed necessary—to draw on techniques that get the child to do what we want the child to do.

Topic(s): Psychology, Professional Development, immittance, otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), tympanometry, Audiometric Test, Acoustic, auditory brainstem response (ABR)

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Publication Issue: Audiology Today January/February 2020

JAAA Editorial: The Effect of Loss of Speech Audibility on a Measure of Cognitive Function

It has been estimated that, in the United States, approximately 75 percent of adults over the age of 70 years have hearing impairment ranging from mild to profound (Goman and Lin, 2016). As the population of the world ages, we will have to contend with a larger number of patients who experience ear-related disorders of aging (e.g., presbycusis and presbystasis) and an assortment of diseases that affect older individuals. Dementia is one of those diseases/disorders.

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Familiarity Equals Interaction

Genesis Politron, a teacher in California, who teaches pre-school and kindergarten saw that there are not too many opportunity for children wearing an amplification device to identify themselves with the toys in their lives. Politron took it upon herself to fill this need and handcrafted dolls who wore cochlear implants and hearing aids. 

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Eerie Experiences of the Ear (Inner)

Have you ever had an “out-of-body” experience (OBE)? An OBE is considered a state where your center of awareness is located outside of your physical body, along with the sensation of seeing the environment from an elevated position. Current neuroscientific models of OBE suggest failure in integration of visual, somatosensory, and yes, vestibular input.

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Get to Know a New Class of Audiologists

It is estimated that two to three of every 1,000 children in the United States are born with some degree of hearing loss and that more will acquire hearing loss later in childhood, according to the National Institutes of Health. The passage of the Newborn and Infant Hearing Screening Act of 1999 and the adoption of universal newborn hearing screenings in many states, in conjunction with early-intervention services, changed lives and outcomes for many children.

Topic(s): Students, Hearing Loss, Bilateral Hearing Loss, Hearing Aids, mastoidectomy, Acoustic, Psychology, cochlear phone clip, cochlear mini-microphone, Academia, Education

Managing Auditory Processing Problems in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Hey, audiologists! Have you ever considered offering auditory processing interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at your clinic or practice?

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Broaching Difficult Conversations: Recommendations for Audiologists

Twentieth century American psychiatrist and internist George Engle observed that, in addition to biophysical and psycho-emotional concerns, patients also exist within a social context encompassing family, friends, and community. Dr. Engel's (1977) biopsychosocial model of health-care engagement underpins what we recognize today as person-centered care. 

Topic(s): Psychology

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The Terminology of False and Exaggerated Hearing Loss

The Problem

Most audiologists probably have encountered a patient who produces within- or among-test discrepancies in audiometric results that have no medical explanation. This phenomenon goes under a multiplicity of terms. In addition to pseudohypacusis, nonorganic hearing loss, and functional hearing loss, there are malingering, dis/simulating, faking, feigning, conversion, hysterical, psychogenic, and more. 

Topic(s): false and exaggerated hearing loss (FEHL), Hearing Loss, Psychology, Audiogram, speech-in-noise, dysphonia, spastic dysphonia, spasmodic dysphonia

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Publication Issue: Audiology Today July/August 2019