Psychology

Psychology

Sound Byte

Listen up audiologists! Your responsibilities just increased to include nutrition for one and all. When children refuse to eat their vegetables at dinner time, parents will be looking to you. When courting couples want to impress their partners about the choice of restaurant or their culinary skills during a quiet evening in, they will be looking to you. When caregivers want to ensure that the elderly under their care eat the right portions of the right kinds of food to sustain themselves, they are going to look to you.

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Medal Music

Athletes from the United States won 117 medals. Those from Ukraine, Great Britain, and China won even more. We are talking about medals at the 2016 Paralympics that followed the summer Olympics in Rio da Janeiro. While the summer Olympics get all their deserved attention, the Paralympics that follow hold a place of particular importance in the Olympic movement. This year’s Paralympics in Rio had a unique twist for us sound geeks.

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Motivational Interviewing: Something to Consider When Fitting Hearing Aids to Patients with Tinnitus?

Zarenoe and colleagues (2016) evaluated motivational interviewing (MI) as a supplement to the traditional hearing fitting delivery model for patients with both hearing loss and tinnitus. MI is a counseling style designed to enhance one’s motivation towards making a behavior change (Miller and Rollnick, 2012).


In this study, 50 patients were originally enrolled into the study, with 25 randomized to receive MI and 25 randomized to “standard practice (SP).” None of these subjects had prior use of hearing aids.


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Neural Circuits and Fear Conditioning

The processing of auditory input involves a complex neural network involving multiple regions of the brain. In particular, the amygdala has been noted as an integrative center in memory, decision making, and emotional response to auditory stimuli.


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Do You Think This Is Far-Fetched?

This is the question Gary Jacobson, editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, poses for us. The question is in the context of a newly published article in the journal that explores the perception about Internet -based delivery of hearing aids amongst older adults. The participants in the study were definitely interested but pointed out various road blocks in place today for internet-based hearing aid delivery to be fully satisfactory. Are these road blocks insurmountable, or simply new territories for technological capture.

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Dizziness, Confusion, Caffeine, and Salt

Beck (2015) reports that no two people experience dizziness the exact same way. What one patient describes as vertigo, another may describe as light-headed, woozy, dizzy, and more. Similar to tinnitus, headaches and lower back pain, one cannot disprove these sensations. However, it’s not just the variation in which words the patient uses, but the variation in the words the clinician uses, may also add to the confusion.

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Behavior Change in the Context of Hearing Health Care: Interview with Fiona Barker, MSc

Douglas L. Beck, AuD, spoke with Dr. Barker about The Cochrane Review on Interventions to Improve Hearing Aid Use, the behaviors of patients and health-care professionals, outcome goals versus behavioral goals, and more.


Academy: Hi, Fiona. Thanks for your time this morning. I know you're very busy re-writing and publishing the 2016 Cochrane Update on Interventions to Improve Hearing Aid Use….and I hope you'll be able to tell us a little about that?


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Hearing Aid Use and Cognitive Function

Dawes et al (2015) sought to “clarify the impact of hearing aids on mental health, social engagement, cognitive function, and physical health outcomes in older adults with hearing impairment….” The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS) in Wisconsin started with 3,753 people who underwent the first round of tests (i.e., “pre-baseline”) in 1993-1995 and included audiometric evaluations as well as a questionnaire on hearing related health, potential risk factors of hearing loss, and self-perceived hearing handicap.

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Professionals, Placebo and Curative Discussions

Opinion Editorial by Douglas L. Beck, AuD

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Cochlear Implant Satisfaction and Psychological Profiles

Kobosko et al (2015) report that when post-lingually deafened adults acquire a cochlear implant, the benefits extend beyond hearing. That is, quality of life improves, as does psychological well-being and social interactions. The authors studied the relationship between cochlear implant (CI) satisfaction and level of psychological distress, stress coping strategies, and global self-esteem.

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