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speech-in-noise

speech-in-noise

JAAA Latest Fast Track Articles—July 5, 2019

As the JAAA editors along with our editorial team, we are proud to announce new Fast Track content for JAAA, as of July 5, 2019. We are working diligently to publish ahead of print. We strive for a two-month turnaround on articles from acceptance to digital publication. Plan to see more of these announcements about content updates each month.

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Post-Menopausal Hormonal Changes and Processing of Auditory Information

Could the hormonal changes associated with menopause affect a woman’s ability to process auditory information?

Trott et al (2019) compared performance on tests of central auditory function between 14 pre-menopausal women (mean age = 30 years) and 14 peri- or post-menopausal women (mean age = 54 years). All subject had pure-tone hearing thresholds of 25 dB HL or better at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz in both of the ears.

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The Terminology of False and Exaggerated Hearing Loss

The Problem

Most audiologists probably have encountered a patient who produces within- or among-test discrepancies in audiometric results that have no medical explanation. This phenomenon goes under a multiplicity of terms. In addition to pseudohypacusis, nonorganic hearing loss, and functional hearing loss, there are malingering, dis/simulating, faking, feigning, conversion, hysterical, psychogenic, and more. 

Topic(s): false and exaggerated hearing loss (FEHL), Hearing Loss, Psychology, Audiogram, speech-in-noise, dysphonia, spastic dysphonia, spasmodic dysphonia

Author(s): 

Publication Issue: Audiology Today July/August 2019

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Feature Story Main Image

A Two-Minute Speech-in-Noise Test: Protocol and Pilot Data

Hearing-care professionals (HCPs) and hearing aid wearers report the chief complaint secondary to hearing loss and to wearing traditional hearing aids, is the inability to understand speech-in-noise (SIN; see Beck et al, 2019). Beck et al (2018) reported that, in addition to the 37 million Americans with audiometric hearing loss, 26 million have hearing difficulty and/or difficulty understanding SIN, despite clinically normal thresholds. As such, helping people hear (i.e., to perceive sound) and helping people listen (i.e., to comprehend, or apply meaning to sound) remains paramount.

Topic(s): speech-in-noise, Hearing, Hearing Loss, Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Noise Reduction, Audiometric Test

JAAA Editorial: Rise of the Machines: Audiology and Mobile Devices

Over the past few decades, advances in mobile device technology have enabled many of the core audiology tests to be delivered through smart phones or tablet computers.

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JAAA Editorial: Time is the Enemy

Vol. 30, No. 2 (February 2019) 
Gary P. Jacobson, Ph.D.
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of the American Academy of Audiology


Gary P. Jacobson, Ph.D
Editor-in-Chief​​​​

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CODING AND REIMBURSEMENT | Demystifying CPT Code 92700

There are Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes for almost every audiology procedure that exists. It is important to use the code that most accurately represents the audiologic procedure or service provided, which is often very straightforward.  

Topic(s): Audiologist, Bone-Anchored Hearing Devices (BHADs), Bone-Conduction Implant (BCI), cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP), speech-in-noise, Tinnitus, saccade, Practice Management, Coding, Reimbursement, Compliance, CPT - Current Procedural Terminology

NPR: Music to Ease Hearing Loss

NPR featured a piece on  “All Things Considered,” considering how to improve speech understanding in noisy environments. The segment focused on an ongoing study by Frank Russo, the director of the Science of Music, Auditory Research, and Technology Lab (SMART Lab) at Ryerson University in Toronto.

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A Proposed Protocol: Assessment for Patients with Single-Sided Deafness or Asymmetric Hearing Loss

Do you fit bone-conduction hearing aids, contralateral routing of signals (CROS) hearing aids, and/or cochlear implants to your adult patients with single-sided deafness or asymmetric hearing loss (with the four-frequency pure-tone average in the poorer ear being greater than or equal to 70 dB HL)? Curious which one is the best treatment? If so, you may be interested in a consensus paper by Van de Heyning et al (2016). 

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