Treatment

Treatment

Extended Bandwidth, Limited Bandwidth, and Frequency Transposition

Lau et al (2014) compared three hearing aid fitting options across 13 adults (5 male, 8 female) with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The three fitting options included a bandwidth limited to 4000 Hz (LBW), an extended bandwidth to 9000 Hz (EBW), and linear frequency transposition that transposed signals above 4000 Hz (LFT).  

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Speech-in-Noise, Frequency Lowering, and More: Interview with Joshua M. Alexander, PhD


Douglas L. Beck, AuD, spoke with Dr. Alexander about frequency transposition, frequency compression, and more.


Douglas L. Beck (DLB): Good morning, Josh. It’s great to speak with you. I’ve been reading your publications for a few years and I’m surprised we haven’t met.


Alexander: Hi, Doug. Thanks…good to speak with you, too.


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Tinnitus Primary Function Questionnaire

Tyler et al (2014) have developed a new questionnaire, the Tinnitus Primary Function Questionnaire (TPFQ,) for use with tinnitus patients. The TPFQ focuses on the primary handicaps related to tinnitus. Although each person manifests tinnitus uniquely, the primary activities impaired by tinnitus are (1) thoughts and emotions (including depression and anxiety), (2) sleep difficulties, (3) hearing difficulties, and (4) concentration.

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Aging and Speech Perception

Jin, Liu, and Sladen reported on the 1988 Working Group on Speech Understanding and Aging Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics and Biomechanics (CHABA), which stated three likely factors for age-related listening problems: (1) changes in the peripheral auditory system, (2) changes in central auditory processing, and (3) changes in cognitive performance.

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Amplification: Spectral Resolution, Working Memory, Audibility, and More

Davies-Venn and Souza (2014) report hearing thresholds (in isolation) do not provide enough information to predict an individual’s success with amplification. Spectral resolution, audibility, and working memory appear to be significant factors, too. Previous studies have shown individual differences in susceptibility to distortions secondary to non-linear amplification are likely to impact outcomes. Although a multitude of previous publications have shown compression systems are superior to linear systems when the compression system provides substantial improvements in audibility.

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Cochlear Implantation with a Normal Hearing Contralateral Ear

Blasco and Redleaf (2014) note that otologists around the world have used cochlear implants (CIs) as an effective therapy for people presenting with severe-to-profound sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) even though the contralateral ear presents with normal hearing. Blasco and Redleaf report that more traditional therapies such as bone-anchored devices and contralateral routing of signal (CROS) provide only minimal benefit for users and those users do worse in noisy backgrounds. 

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Acoustic Neuroma Management 2014

Fayad et al (2014) reported on 114 vestibular schwannoma (VS, aka acoustic neuroma) patients observed via serial gadolinium enhanced MRI, with regard to tumor size measurement. They report that 38 percent of tumors grew (on average) 3.1 mm annually and importantly, only approximately 31 percent of all patients had treatment beyond “watch and wait.”  Of note, for patients followed 5 to 10 years, approximately one-fifth had additional treatment (radio-therapy or surgical management). The authors report that of the 12 patients followed 10 years or more, only one had additional treatment.

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Issues in Chronic Tinnitus, Treatment and Management

Folmer et al (2014) describe and critique multiple tinnitus treatments for tinnitus. They report that “effective treatments for tinnitus are generally outnumbered by ineffective strategies, medications, devices, and surgeries…” which continue to be developed and promoted to treat tinnitus. The authors peformed an extensive, selective review of publications (from MedLine and PubMed) on tinnitus, published between 1940 and 2012.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Tinnitus

Cima et al (2014) report that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the most evidence-based treatment option (so far) with regard to managing the tinnitus patient. In their report, they note that 15-21 percent of the adult population perceives tinnitus and some 3 to 5 percent of the population reports their tinnitus is bothersome and incapacitating. Cima et al note that evidence suggests severe tinnitus distress may come from “cognitive misinterpretations, negative emotional reactivity, and dysfunctional attentional processes,” which may facilitate dysfunctional tinnitus habituation.

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Remote Microphones, Normal Hearing, and APD

Keith and Purdy (2014) report that "remote microphone hearing aids are hybrid radio and hearing aid systems designed for children with normal peripheral hearing…". They state that FM systems are increasingly being replaced by digital modulation wireless technologies. The authors report that published evidence and their own personal experience suggests the majority of children with auditory processing disorder (APD) benefit from amplification with remote microphone hearing aids.

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