Treatment

Treatment

Tinnitus Etiology and Perceived Pitch

Zagolski and Strek (2014) report that tinnitus pitch and minimum masking level (MML) are dependent on the etiology of the tinnitus—MML is defined as the level at which tinnitus was just rendered inaudible and defined in dB SL. They report on 405 adults with a mean age of 51 years (range 17 to 85 yrs), including 195 females and 210 males. Two hundred and twenty (220) people reported bilateral tinnitus and 185 reported unilateral tinnitus, resulting in 625 ears with tinnitus. Of note, in 512 ears, tinnitus was described as a pure-tone, in 113 ears, tinnitus was described as pulsing/popping.

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Hearing Aid Acquisition Changing at the Speed of Sound

Professions, professionals, and protocols change. For example, only a few years ago, many professionals would have said the Internet and direct mail acquisition of hearing aids has not impacted their practice, and further, many professionals refused to help patients who purchased their hearing aids online. It’s changed.

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Tinnitus Management 2014: Part One

Fagelson (2014) reports that tinnitus affects some 10 to 15 percent of the population. He reports that there is no relationship between the distress/severity of the perceived tinnitus and auditory sensitivity and indeed, some 50 percent (or more) of tinnitus sufferers have a comorbid psychological injury or illness such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTST), depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, stress, and more.

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Cochlear Implant Programming on a Global Scale

As we are each familiar, cochlear implant (CI) programming (i.e., "mapping") is a necessary step in the post-operative aural rehabilitation of the CI patient. However, excellent clinical practice guides appear to be lacking, in general, from a global perspective. The authors distributed a questionnaire to 47 CI centers, following more than 47,000 CI patients and, of note, each questionnaire was returned. View the distributed questionnaire.


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BiCROS in Noise

Oeding and Valente (2013) examined the performance of a bilateral contralateral routing of signal (BiCROS) hearing aid in noise while engaging the receiver and transmitter noise reduction (NR) technology within Unitron’s Tandem 16 (16 channel) BiCROS hearing aid. The authors report that there are few peer-reviewed studies in which the efficacy and effectiveness of BiCROS technology has been examined in background noise. Twenty-one adults experienced with BiCROS participated in the study.

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Textbook of Hearing Aid Amplification: Interview with Michael J. Metz, PhD

Douglas L. Beck, AuD, spoke with Dr. Metz about his rewrite of Sandlin’s book, Textbook of Hearing Aid Amplification, and how things have changed in the third edition.


Academy: Hi, Mike. Great to hear your voice! Thanks for your time today.


Metz: Hi, Doug. Thanks, good to speak with you, too.


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Pediatric Amplification Perspectives 2014: Part 2

Dillon, Ching, and Golding (2014) report commercially available hearing aids are available that switch automatically from omni to directional mode (if and only if) the directional mode has a superior signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Further, it is well known and has been consistently demonstrated that children require a more advantageous SNR than do adults, and it is far more likely that adaptive directionality will provide a listening advantage rather than a disadvantage.

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Pediatric Amplification Perspectives 2014: Part 1

Dillon, Ching, and Golding (2014) report three major reasons why special considerations are needed when fitting hearing aids to children.

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Parkinson's Disease: Update 2008

Parkinson's Disease (PD) is referred to as a motor system disorder resulting from loss of dopamine-producing brain cells. PD usually impacts people over age 50, but can sometimes affect younger people as well. Diagnosis of PD is based on clinical signs and symptoms, there are no objective tests (blood tests, radiographic studies, etc.) of PD. The four primary symptoms of PD include:


  1. Tremor/trembling in hands, arms, legs, jaw, and face.
  2. Rigidity, or stiffness of the limbs and trunk.

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Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss—Treatment Status

Dallan, De Vito, and colleagues (2010) re-stated the previously declared nature of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) as a true audiological emergency. However, they state that the natural history of SSNHL is currently unknown (i.e., how often does it occur, how much will resolve if untreated, what are the natural outcomes if untreated, which treatments have a scientific basis, what are the outcomes of the scientifically proven treatments, etc.). Dallan, De Vito, and colleagues report that the unknowns are important factors in understanding and evaluating treatments.

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