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Hearing

Hearing

Feature Story Main Image
Feature Story Main Image

A Two-Minute Speech-in-Noise Test: Protocol and Pilot Data

Hearing-care professionals (HCPs) and hearing aid wearers report the chief complaint secondary to hearing loss and to wearing traditional hearing aids, is the inability to understand speech-in-noise (SIN; see Beck et al, 2019). Beck et al (2018) reported that, in addition to the 37 million Americans with audiometric hearing loss, 26 million have hearing difficulty and/or difficulty understanding SIN, despite clinically normal thresholds. As such, helping people hear (i.e., to perceive sound) and helping people listen (i.e., to comprehend, or apply meaning to sound) remains paramount.

Topic(s): speech-in-noise, Hearing, Hearing Loss, Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Noise Reduction, Audiometric Test

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Tinnitus in 10: What Every Audiologist Should Know to Provide Research-Based Care

Tinnitus is an invisible condition affecting 10 percent to 15 percent of adults (Hoffman and Reed, 2004). Chronic tinnitus is defined as the persistent perception of sound when there is no external source (Jastreboff, 1990). It generally is accepted that tinnitus is manageable and not bothersome for about 80 percent of those who experience it (Davis and Refaie, 2000; Hoffman and Reed, 2004; Jastreboff and Hazell, 1998). That is, most people who experience tinnitus tend to ignore it and are not interested in receiving specialized clinical services.

Topic(s): Hearing, Tinnitus, Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Meniere’s Disease (MD), tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT), Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI), tinnitus education (TED), tinnitus masking (TM)

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Publication Issue: Audiology Today May/June 2019

Auburn University Students Advocate for Audiology in Washington, DC

On March 11, a group of five students from the University of Auburn’s audiology program came to Washington, DC for the first time to meet with their elected officials and advocate for audiology and the importance of hearing health care.

Audiology Today Mar/Apr 2019…What’s Inside This Issue?

The editorial team and I are so happy to announce the content for this latest issue of Audiology Today. We are featuring a number of comprehensive, relevant, and interesting articles, as well as some short reads on public relations, coding and reimbursement, and audiology advocacy.

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Strategies for Increasing Medical Community Awareness of Audiology: A Call to Action!

With increased competition in the marketplace and changes in regulations allowing for over-the-counter (OTC) direct hearing aid sales to consumers, audiologists are becoming more dependent on hearing aid revenue as their main source of income. Thus, we quickly are realizing the urgency and need for increasing public and medical awareness of audiology.

Topic(s): Audiologist, Hearing, Public Awareness, Professional

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JAAA Editorial: Time is the Enemy

Vol. 30, No. 2 (February 2019) 
Gary P. Jacobson, Ph.D.
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of the American Academy of Audiology


Gary P. Jacobson, Ph.D
Editor-in-Chief​​​​

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World Hearing Day Is March 3: Spread the Word

On March 3, 2019, we celebrate World Hearing Day, a day to spread the word about the importance of hearing health and management. This year’s theme is “Check your hearing!” which emphasizes the importance of early identification and intervention for hearing loss.

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Don’t Like Mosquito Bites? Shut Up!

Prevailing dogma is that…to hear in the far field, an animal needs an eardrum that registers changes in pressure. It would then follow that insects such as the mosquito could not hear over any distance because their hearing happens through detecting particle velocity via antennae. That is right. Mosquitos and other insects hear when the movement of air particles moves their antenna, firing neurons connected to the root of the antennae.

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