Adult

Adult

Size Matters

Multiple research studies have consistently shown taller people earn more than less-tall people. Taller people are often more successful in business and they seem to date more.

Read more

Tinnitus Modulation via Visual, Tactile, and Muscular Stimulation

Sanchez and Akemni (2008) offer an interesting and unique chapter on modulating tinnitus via non-auditory and non-traditional protocols. They note that attributes of tinnitus can sometimes be changed by forceful head and neck muscle contraction, vertical or horizontal eye movements, stimulation of the hand or finger, electrical stimulation of the median nerve, and sometimes with pressure applied to the temporomandibular joint.

Read more

The Role of Videonystagmography (VNG)

Many decades ago, vestibular assessment consisted entirely of electronystagmography (ENG). Although ENG still serves as the “gold standard” for unilateral peripheral vestibular system impairment, ENG is inadequate for assessment and diagnosis of bilateral peripheral vestibular system impairment.

Read more

Multitasking, Cognition, and Cell Phone Distractions

Everyone thinks they can multi-task. However, as reported by the California Department of Motor Vehicles (2009), based on a study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 80 percent of all car crashes involve driver distraction within three seconds of the crash. The primary distractions include cell phone use (texting and phoning), reaching for things within the vehicle, looking at things outside the vehicle, reading, and applying make-up.

Read more

Auditory Fitness for Duty

Tufts, Vasil, and Briggs (2009) described the concept and factors impacting "Auditory Fitness for Duty" (AFFD). AFFD can be defined as possessing hearing ability sufficient for safe and effective job performance. Occupations impacted by AFFD are vast and include military personnel, miners, police officers, fire-fighters, pilots, air traffic controllers, etc. Clearly, not hearing well in these (and other) "hearing critical" occupations would be a significant liability. Additionally, people with hearing impairment appear to be under more stress than normal hearing peers.

Read more

Hearing Aid Candidacy

Walden et al (2009) notes that hearing aids certainly improve the quality of life and provide benefit for people with hearing impairment. However, only a relatively small proportion of people with hearing loss (less than 25 percent) choose to wear amplification. Among the impediments that contribute to the lack of hearing aid acceptance by hearing-impaired people are cost, stigma, and the perceived limits of amplification to help in challenging situations.

Read more

Real Ear to Coupler Difference Comparing Left to Right Ears

Of course, measured real-ear values are always preferred and are more accurate than estimated real-ear values. However, sometimes measuring the actual real-ear value is very difficult, sometimes it is very time consuming and some may argue that on occasion, acquiring measured values may be nearly impossible to obtain due to crying or squirmy children and a waiting room full of more of the same! Of course, with cooperative patients, obtaining these measures literally takes seconds and measuring is always the first choice for all clinical protocols.

Read more

Global Hearing Loss and Related Issues

Tucci, Merson, and Wilson (2010) engaged in a massive literature review of hundreds of articles from 1980 to today. Among the key points addressed:

Read more

Hearing Preservation and Acoustic Neuromas

Stangerup et al (2010) reported for many people diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma, AN) the tumors do not grow after diagnosis. Thus, many physicians recommend a “wait and scan” approach when tumors were 20 mm or less (1,105 patients) or when patients were in poor health, were of old age, or had other personal reasons (39 patients). The authors reviewed 2,283 patients diagnosed with AN between 1976 and 2008. Of those, 1,144 patients were managed by “wait and scan” approaches, including annual MRI and annual audiological evaluation.

Read more

When Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids Overlap

Zhang, Spahr, and Dorman (2010) assessed speech recognition in eight adult, post-lingually deafened, monaurally fitted cochlear implant (CI) patients. Seven of the patients wore hearing aids (HAs) in the contralateral ear. An area of "frequency overlap" between HA and CI perceptions was present between approximately 250 and 750 Hz as all eight patients had residual hearing less than or equal to 65 dB HL at 500 Hz and below, and had residual hearing greater than or equal to 65 dB HL at 1000 Hz and higher.

Read more